What Is ASPnet?Top of page

In 1953, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) initiated the Associated Schools Project Network (ASPnet). The purpose of the initiative was to give concrete expression to UNESCO’s overarching mission of promoting peace and international cooperation through education. Schools that join ASPnet are committed to promoting UNESCO’s ideals by undertaking projects that prepare young people to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex world. ASPnet teachers and students have the chance to work together to develop innovative educational approaches, methods and materials at the local, national and global levels. Read more about ASPnet on the Canadian Commission for UNESCO website.

Structure and Plan for a Canadian ASPnetTop of page

In the fall of 2001 the Canadian Commission for UNESCO (CCU) began exploring the possibility of establishing an ASPnet in Canada. The CCU subsequently approached the Council of Ministers of Education of Canada (CMEC) about establishing a Canadian ASPnet. The CMEC, in turn, asked each of the provincial and territorial governments to appoint a coordinator to work with the CCU on a national pilot project. The purpose of the national ASPnet pilot project was to encourage schools from across Canada to participate in an ASPnet.

Many provinces have a coordinator to oversee ASPnet. In Alberta, the provincial coordinator is Robert Mazzotta, Executive Staff Officer, Member Services, for the Alberta Teachers' Association. The ATA also serves as the Western Regional Coordinating body for ASPnet and coordinates schools in the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan.

Schools wishing to join the ASPnet must meet strict criteria. A school that is first accepted into the program is known as a candidate school. When a school has met the stated goals, a school may apply through the provincial coordinator to the CCU in Ottawa for full membership in the network. 

Expectations for Membership in the Canadian NetworkTop of page

Preamble

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization was established in 1946 with the purpose of contributing to world peace and security. The UNESCO vision promotes collaboration among the nations through education, science and culture to further universal respect for justice, the rule of law, human rights and fundamental freedoms, which are affirmed for the peoples of the world without distinction of race, sex, language or religion.

Canadian schools that join the UNESCO Associated Schools Project Network (ASPnet) make a commitment to support the ideals of UNESCO, through four pillars of learning and four themes of study, in order to contribute to a local, national and global culture of peace.

Pillars of Learning*

Themes of Study

Learning to know

UNESCO Associated Schools and UN Priorities

Learning to do

Education for sustainable development

Learning to be all that one can be

Peace and human rights

Learning to live together sustainably

Intercultural learning

*Established by the UNESCO International Commission on Education for the 21st Century.

Expectations for membership in the Canadian Associated Schools network have been established by the Canadian Commission for UNESCO and include two levels: Candidate Schools and Member Schools. Candidate Schools are interested in joining the network and are working towards the deep cultural shift that signifies a UNESCO school. Member schools have demonstrated a sustained commitment to the ideals, values, work and principles of UNESCO. Specific standards for each level follow below.

Candidate School Goals

  1. Build support and commitment to the values, work and principles of UNESCO from the school administration, the school district administration, the staff, the student body and parents/community. This includes designating a key contact for UNESCO activities at the school level, and where possible, at the student level.
  2. Ensure that UNESCO Theme 1 “World Issues and the Role of the UN” provides a focus for curricular and extracurricular programming leading to an informed student body.
  3. Staff are engaged in professional development in pursuit of the school’s UNESCO themes and pillars.
  4. Pursue project opportunities with other UNESCO Associated Schools.
  5. Explore connections with at least one other school in the Canadian network.
  6. Establish partnerships in the community to work toward UNESCO ideals.*
  7. Begin to integrate UNESCO pillars and themes into curricular and extracurricular programs, and into school policies and practices.
  8. Highlight international days, weeks, years or decades as designated by the United Nations and UNESCO.
  9. Attend regularly scheduled network meetings.
  10. Regularly produce a UNESCO school plan which reports on past achievements and describes future goals. Submit, via the provincial/territorial coordinator, the UNESCO school plan to the national coordinator.

Member School Expectations

When a school feels ready to request full membership in the network, the following expectations need to be demonstrated:

  1. Provide evidence of sustained commitment to the values, work and principles of UNESCO from the school administration, the school district administration, the staff, the student body and parents/community in order to build a culture of peace. This includes designating a key contact for UNESCO activities at the school level, in addition to an administrator, and where possible, at the student level.
  2. Provide evidence that UNESCO Theme 1 “World Issues and the Role of the UN” provides a focus for curricular and extracurricular programming leading to an informed student body.
  3. Staff are engaged in professional development in pursuit of the school’s UNESCO goals and/or projects.
  4. Sustain projects with at least one other school in the Canadian network and at least one other school in the international network.
  5. Provide evidence over a sustained period of time of collaboration with the community, organizations or agencies to realize UNESCO ideals.
  6. Provide evidence that the school has linked UNESCO pillars and themes with curricular and extracurricular programs and integrated them into school policies and practices.
  7. Provide evidence over a sustained period of time of successful action taken to incorporate within the school a culture that reflects UNESCO ideals.
  8. Highlight international days, weeks, years or decades as designated by the United Nations and UNESCO.
  9. Attend network meetings at the provincial level and where possible at the national level.
  10. Regularly produce a UNESCO school plan which reports on past achievements and describes future goals. Submit, via the provincial/territorial coordinator, the UNESCO school plan to the national coordinator.

Network membership may be revoked if annual reports are not submitted in a timely fashion or if report information indicates that a school is no longer maintaining the expectations related to membership. Copies of the annual reports are available by contacting the provincial coordinator.

UNESCO SchoolsTop of page

AlbertaTop of page

Member Schools
  • Calgary French and International School, Calgary
  • École Airdrie Middle School, Airdrie
  • École francophone d’Airdrie, Airdrie    
  • Griffiths-Scott Middle School, Millet
  • Niton Central School, Niton Junction 
  • Olds High School, Olds
  • Queen Elizabeth High School, Edmonton 
Candidate Schools
  • Alexander Ferguson School, Calgary
  • École de la Source, Calgary    
  • Ḗcole le Ruisseau School, Brooks
  • Ḗcole Secondaire Ste Marguerite d'Youville School, St Albert
  • Escuela Pines School, Red Deer 
  • Glendale Sciences and Technology School, Red Deer
  • Holy Trinity Catholic High School, Fort McMurray
  • Keenooshayo Elementary School, St Albert 
  • M E LaZerte High School, Edmonton

British ColumbiaTop of page

Member Schools
  • Canyon Lister Elementary, Canyon
Candidate Schools
  • Sa-Hali Secondary School, Kamloops
  • Trafalgar Elementary School, Vancouver

SaskatchewanTop of page

Member Schools
  • Bethlehem Catholic High School, Saskatoon
  • Hafford Central School, Hafford
  • Ranch Ehrlo Society, Pilot Butte
Candidate Schools
  • Holy Family Catholic School, Saskatoon
  • St Edward School, Saskatoon
  • St Joseph High School, Saskatoon

FormsTop of page

ASPnet School Report Form 
ASPnet School Report Form (en Francais) 
Candidate School Application 
Candidate School Application (en Francais) 
Alberta UNESCO Associated Schools 2016-17 

Applying to be a Candidate SchoolTop of page

Prior to submitting an application, schools are encouraged to contact Robert Mazzotta to discuss their interest. He can be contacted at 780-447-9445 or 1-800-232-7208 (toll free in Alberta), or Robert.Mazzotta@ata.ab.ca.

Schools interested in applying to be a candidate school should download and complete a  Candidate School Application [Candidate School Application (en Francais)] and mail it, together will a letter of support from their superintendent, to the following address:

Robert Mazzotta
Executive Staff Officer, Member Services
The Alberta Teachers' Association
11010 42 Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5N 2R1